Social Impact of Parental Imprisonment on Left behind Children: A Study of Dir Lower, Pakistan

Authors

  • Majid Khan Department of Rural Sociology, The University of Agriculture, Peshawar Pakistan.
  • Noor Ullah Khan Department of Political Science, University of Peshawar, Peshawar Pakistan. | Department of Civics-cum-History, FG College Nowshera Cantt., Pakistan.
  • Akhtar Ali Department of Rural Sociology, The University of Agriculture, Peshawar Pakistan.

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.47264/idea.lassij/1.1.5

Keywords:

Anti-social Behavior, Social Interaction, Left-behind Children, Children, Parental Imprisonment, Social Impact of Imprisonment

Abstract

This study assesses the anti-social behavior of left-behind children when their parents are convicted and put in prison. The researchers conducted a primary study and collected and analyzed data through quantitative methods. The study is conducted with the randomly selected households in Dir lower, Malakand Division. The relevant literature on the effects of parental incarceration over their left-behind children is also consulted to show the contribution of the study. The study argues that unattended children of imprisoned parents tend to show anti-social and disruptive behavior. Firstly, they do not socialize with others more often and remain to themselves. They do not abide by the approved norms of society (polite manners) since they feel neglected and left behind. Additionally, they showed rude behavior and would engage in frequent brawls in the neighborhoods. Furthermore, teasing and taunting others for their racial backgrounds or other dominant features of identity is another activity they found engaged int. The study recommends taking holistic measures for mainstreaming these children and engage them in positive activities so that they do not fall prey to criminal tendencies.

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Published

2017-12-31

How to Cite

Khan, M., Khan, N. U., & Ali, A. (2017). Social Impact of Parental Imprisonment on Left behind Children: A Study of Dir Lower, Pakistan. Liberal Arts and Social Sciences International Journal (LASSIJ), 1(1), 41–48. https://doi.org/10.47264/idea.lassij/1.1.5

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Section

Research Articles | Original Articles | Original Research

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